Using ARKit at the Ballpark

Jason Snell got to try out MLB At Bat’s new AR features at a Giants game:

If you don’t know about Statcast, here’s the deal: Every major-league ballpark is equipped with imaging equipment that allows MLB to measure, at a rate of 60 frames per second, the position of every player on the field, as well as the location of the ball. It’s a technological revolution that is allowing teams and researchers alike to understand aspects of baseball that were previously thought to be unmeasurable, because they go beyond traditional stats that simply measure the outcomes of individual plays.

That data is available in real time—and it’s being tapped by the MLB At Bat app to power its augmented-reality view. Sitting at AT&T Park in San Francisco, we were able to look at an iPad pointed at the field and see floating icons with pictures of each player on the field—and the icons that moved as the players moved. Tapping on the shortstop’s icon added a colored shape indicating his fielding range, the area where he’d be expected to stop a ball and make an out. When a runner took a lead, the app could display the length of his lead.

As a huge tech and sports nerd, I highly enjoyed reading Snell’s story. From an accessibility perspective, I’m curious to see how visually accessible MLB’s implementation of ARKit is. Baseball is my favorite sport, and this is one use case for augmented reality that has strong appeal to me.