On Broadband in America and Corporate Cronyism

David Cay Johnston for Newsweek, on the sad state of affairs that is US broadband:

After making a big, bold promise to wire every corner of America, the telecom giants are running away from their vow to provide nationwide broadband service by 2020. For almost 20 years, AT&T, Verizon and the other big players have collected hundreds of billions of dollars through rate increases and surcharges to finance that ambitious plan, but after wiring the high-density big cities, they now say it's too expensive to connect the rest of the country. But they'd like to keep all that money they banked for the project. [...] The federal government's official broadband map shows vast areas of America still have little or no service, and many areas will never get it under the current plan. "Small business customers, people who work at home and rural communities across the country need to wake up before it is too late," says Regina Costa, telecommunications research director for the Utility Reform Network in California. "Verizon and AT&T are aggressively moving to dump a large percentage of their landlines and force customers to wireless networks [that] are expensive, restrictive, incompatible with medic-alert services, less reliable for 911 calls and will not hold up during power outages—and in a lot of places wireless just won't work." The telcom company execs should have a special place in Hell reserved for them, right next to the Wall St. cronies. This is a perfect example of corporate democracy --- it's sanctioned corruption, and it's disgusting. (via Daring Fireball)